To-Do-List vs Success List by Gary Keller

To-do lists tend to be long; success lists are short.

One pulls you in all directions; the other aims you in a specific direction.

One is a disorganized directory and the other is an organized directive.

If a list isn’t built around success, then that’s not where it takes you.

If your to-do list contains everything, then it’s probably taking you everywhere but where you really want to go.

Taken from his book: The ONE Thing

How we can build self-efficacy by Albert Bandura

Selfefficacy is a person’s belief in his or her ability to succeed in a particular situation.

Four ways we can build self-efficacy

1. Mastery Experience. In other words, PAST SUCCESS. Small and big wins from the past are GREAT ways to boost your current confidence. Create those wins, feast on them as you build your self-image as someone who succeeds (“That’s like me!!), and brings those past mastery experiences to mind when you’re facing current challenges.

2. Vicarious Learning. In other words, seeing someone else achieve the success YOU would like to achieve. The basic idea here: If they can do it, YOU can do it. KNOW that. DO NOT get envious of their success. Celebrate it. And say, “If they can do it, I can do it.”

3. Social Persuasion. In other words, someone tells you that you can achieve success. Like a coach. Or supportive parent or friend. “YOU’VE GOT THIS!!!” You can also persuade yourself through positive self-talk and an antifragile, confident mindset. And, remember to be the one persuading others of their potential!

4. Physiology. In other words, if you want to succeed, ACT like a successful person. Walk, talk, breathe, and carry yourself as if you’ve already achieved that which you aspire to achieve. Presence-101 style. Strike a power pose and go rock it

(Brian Johnson +1)

How you practice = How you play

“How you practice = How you play.

It’s that simple.

I don’t care if we’re talking about basketball or ballet, cooking or checkers.

The way in which you prepare for a challenge is usually related to your success in that same challenge.

If the level at which you practice is commensurate with the task, then on ‘game day,’ you’ll be fine.”

– Jerry Rice

Enthusiasm

Enthusiasm is one of the most powerful engines of success.

When you do a thing, do it with all your might.

Put your whole soul into it.

Stamp it with your own personality.

Be active, be energetic, be enthusiastic and faithful, and you will accomplish your object.

Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm