Cultivate Gratitude by Robert Emmans

Taken from Gratitude Works

When people regularly cultivate gratitude, they experience a multitude of psychological, physical, interpersonal, and spiritual benefits.

Gratitude has one of the strongest links to mental health and satisfaction with life of any personality trait—more so than even optimism, hope, or compassion.

Grateful people experience higher levels of positive emotions such as joy, enthusiasm, love, happiness, and optimism, and gratitude as a discipline protects us from the destructive impulses of envy, resentment, greed, and bitterness.

People who experience gratitude can cope more effectively with everyday stress, show increased resilience in the face of trauma-induced stress, recover more quickly from illness, and enjoy more robust physical health.

Many of these effects are quantifiable.

Consider these eye-popping statistics. People are 25 percent happier if they keep gratitude journals, sleep one-half hour more per evening, and exercise 33 percent more each week compared to persons who are not keeping these journals. …

Experiencing gratitude leads to increased feelings of connectedness, improved relationships, and even altruism.

We have also found that when people experience gratitude, they feel more loving, more forgiving, and closer to God.