Cultivate Gratitude by Robert Emmans

Taken from Gratitude Works

When people regularly cultivate gratitude, they experience a multitude of psychological, physical, interpersonal, and spiritual benefits.

Gratitude has one of the strongest links to mental health and satisfaction with life of any personality trait—more so than even optimism, hope, or compassion.

Grateful people experience higher levels of positive emotions such as joy, enthusiasm, love, happiness, and optimism, and gratitude as a discipline protects us from the destructive impulses of envy, resentment, greed, and bitterness.

People who experience gratitude can cope more effectively with everyday stress, show increased resilience in the face of trauma-induced stress, recover more quickly from illness, and enjoy more robust physical health.

Many of these effects are quantifiable.

Consider these eye-popping statistics. People are 25 percent happier if they keep gratitude journals, sleep one-half hour more per evening, and exercise 33 percent more each week compared to persons who are not keeping these journals. …

Experiencing gratitude leads to increased feelings of connectedness, improved relationships, and even altruism.

We have also found that when people experience gratitude, they feel more loving, more forgiving, and closer to God.

Meditation

I am a very busy person and find it hard to meditate. I know it has many good benefits for me. but the moment I start meditating all sorts of unnecessary stuff enters my mind diverting me from my meditation routine. I cannot become still for long enough.

My new year’s resolution is to try and meditate if only for 5 minutes at a time, then longer, and even longer until I can reach my goal of about 1 hour. To meditate is good for our body and soul and here are some benefits:

  • it improves our physical and emotional health
  • it helps lower our blood pressure
  • we have greater resistance to disease
  • we are less stressful to challenging situations
  • we have better work performance
  • we have greater self-esteem
  • we have more nourishing relationships

Let us all try and make meditation part of our daily routine, like eating and sleeping. I am going to try my best.

Namaste.

Hatha yoga / physical yoga

Raja yoga, “the royal yoga”

Hatha yoga requires withdrawing oneself from society, living as a recluse and subjugating the body. Raja yoga was developed by heads (raja-s) of monasteries who were too busy to practise hatha yoga. Its techniques (which are simple, although not necessarily easy to master) may be practised by anyone and are used to attain the benefits of yoga while leading a life of engagement with family and work.