Compassion

The definition of compassion: a sympathetic awareness of another’s distress, often through unconditional love.

What is the purpose of compassion?

Compassion is the quality that teaches that there is perfection in all things and that we are to have sympathy for others, even though they may not see things the way we do.

Compassion replaces judgment.

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Love

Love, like rain, can nourish from above,

drenching couples with a soaking joy.

But sometimes, under the angry heat of life,

Love dries on the surface and must nourish from below,

tending to its roots, keeping itself alive.

Parenthood

Parents rarely let go of their children, so children let go of them.

Children move on, they move away.

The moments that used to define them,

a mother’s approval, a father’s nod, are covered by moments of their own accomplishments.

It’s not until much later, as the skin sags and the heart weakens, that children understand.

Their stories, and all their accomplishments, sit atop the stories of their mothers and fathers, store upon stone, beneath the waters of their lives.

Anger vs Forgiveness

Holding anger is like a poison

It eats you from inside

We think that hating is a weapon that attacks the person who harmed us

But hatred is a curved blade

And the harm we do, we do to ourselves.

FORGIVE!

No one is born with anger.

When we die, the soul is freed to it.

London – a poem by William Blake

I wander through each chartered street,

Near where the chartered Thames does flow,

And mark in every face I meet marks of weakness, marks of woe.

In every cry of every man,

In every infant’s cry of fear, in every voice, in every ban,

The mind-forged manacles I hear how the chimney-sweeper’s cry

Every black’ning church appeals,

And the hapless soldier’s sigh runs in blood down palace walls.

But most through midnight streets

I hear how the youthful harlot’s curse

Blasts the new-born infant’s tear,

And blights with plagues the marriage hearse.

Courage by Robert Biswar-Diener

Courage contains two primary internal elements: the willingness to act and the ability to control fear.

When you can successfully curb your fears and boost your ability to take action, you are better able to live a full and virtuous life.

You are more likely to face challenges with grace, connect with and inspire others, and be a force for good.

Taken from: The Courage Quotient: How Science Can Make You Braver